The UGA Vegetable Team works collaboratively to take a sustainable approach in tackling important issues facing Georgia's vegetable producers.

Members of the team reach growers through Georgia Extension agents, as well as partnering with such groups as the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association, Georgia Watermelon Growers Association and Eastern Cantaloupe Growers Association.




Tomato lovers will attest that homegrown always tastes best, even if they don't always win beauty contests. CAES News
Too much love can ruin the chances of growing perfect summer tomatoes
During the summer growing season, the love many have for a homegrown tomato approaches obsession. In fact, some people love tomatoes so much that they struggle to grow them — because they give their plants too much care.
Qian Feng, a second-year doctoral candidate in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has mapped additional genes responsible for volatile production in order to offer a more complete picture of the biochemical pathways in tomatoes. She hopes that other researchers can introduce the desirable genes into current or new varieties to breed a tastier  tomato. CAES News
UGA student investigates why modern tomatoes have lost their flavor
Why have tomatoes lost their flavor? Why do some dishes call for ketchup when cooking with tomatoes? These are a couple of the questions that Qian Feng, a second-year University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences doctoral candidate, seeks to answer through her research.
Watermelon research at the UGA-Tifton campus. CAES News
New rapid test for watermelon disease
Fusarium wilt, caused by a soilborne fungus, is one of the most damaging diseases of watermelons worldwide. Since it was discovered in 1894, it’s been a battle for producers to manage through crop rotation and chemical fungicides.
Blossom-end rot, which manifests in the first few weeks of growth after tomato flowers are pollinated, causes black, rotted areas on the blossom end of the fruit, opposite the stem. CAES News
Getting to the bottom of blossom-end rot
Home gardeners and commercial farmers alike can attest to the disappointment of seeing a beautiful tomato ripening on a vine, only to discover that the fruit has dark, sunken pits at the blossom end of the fruit. Called blossom-end rot (BER), this physiological disorder is prevalent in fruit and vegetable crops, including tomatoes, and can cause severe economic losses.

Vegetable Team Calendar