The UGA Vegetable Team works collaboratively to take a sustainable approach in tackling important issues facing Georgia's vegetable producers.

Members of the team reach growers through Georgia Extension agents, as well as partnering with such groups as the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association, Georgia Watermelon Growers Association and Eastern Cantaloupe Growers Association.




UGA horticulture Professor Marc van Iersel's research focuses on developing sustainable and cost-effective ways to ensure that crops — such as these turnip plants in a grow room at his greenhouses — get the amount of light they need to grow. CAES News
Controlled environment agriculture poised to become a growth industry
Next time you sit down to a crisp, green salad take a little time to think about where your leafy greens come from. Traditional agriculture is highly weather dependent, and many producers of high-value crops are shifting over from field production to controlled environment agriculture.
UGA plant pathologist Bhabesh Dutta examines onion seedlings in research facilities on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
New “onion devourer” bacteria found by UGA researchers
University of Georgia researchers have identified a new species of bacteria, which they have named Pseudomonas alliivorans — from “allium vorans,” which translates as onion devourer or eater.
Senior 4-H’er Maggie Payne poses with her first-place winning 650-pound pumpkin at the Union County Extension Office. CAES News
Georgia 4-H Pumpkin Growing Contest celebrates 650-pound winner
More than 30 4-H’ers from across Georgia competed in the 2021 Georgia 4-H Pumpkin Growing Contest, with the winning pumpkin weighing in at 650 pounds. The Pumpkin Growing Contest offers students the opportunity to learn and utilize knowledge of agricultural and environmental sciences to produce prize-winning fruit.
In the spring, crape myrtles add color with flowers. In the fall, they add color with brightly colored leaves. CAES News
Avoid 'crape murder,' prep your crape myrtles for success
Southern gardeners love crape myrtles, but many don’t know how to care for them to realize the full, gorgeous blooms they expect in the summer.